All NDEI technicians are certified through outside organizations in Acoustic Emission Testing on Composites and Metal Vessels (MONPAC Certified). In addition to outside certification, all technicians are certified as per SNT-TC-1A requirements in Acoustic Emission Testing, Ultrasonics, Barcol Hardenss, Liquid Penetrant and Visual Inspections.


Traditional Non Destructive Testing:


AE Testing


Acoustic emission (AE) is the phenomenon of radiation of acoustic (elastic) waves in solids that occurs when a material undergoes irreversible changes in its internal structure, for example as a result of crack formation or plastic deformation due to aging, temperature gradients or external mechanical forces. In particular, AE is occurring during the processes of mechanical loading of materials and structures accompanied by structural changes that generate local sources of elastic waves. This results in small surface displacements of a material produced by elastic or stress waves generated when the accumulated elastic energy in a material or on its surface is released rapidly. The waves generated by sources of AE are of practical interest in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM), quality control, system feedback, process monitoring and others. In SHM applications, AE is typically used to detect, locate and characterise damage. (click here for a Sample AE Test)




Ultrasonics


Ultrasonic testing (UT) is a family of non-destructive testing techniques based on the propagation of ultrasonic waves in the object or material tested. In most common UT applications, very short ultrasonic pulse-waves with center frequencies ranging from 0.1-15 MHz, and occasionally up to 50 MHz, are transmitted into materials to detect internal flaws or to characterize materials. A common example is ultrasonic thickness measurement, which tests the thickness of the test object, for example, to monitor pipework corrosion. Ultrasonic testing is often performed on steel and other metals and alloys, though it can also be used on concrete, wood and composites, albeit with less resolution. It is used in many industries including steel and aluminium construction, metallurgy, manufacturing, aerospace, automotive and other transportation sectors.






Pit Gauging


A Pit Gauge is an industrial tool widely used to measure the wall thickness of structures like plates or pipes. With this tool, plumbers, pipeliners, warehouse personnel, fabricators and even buyers are able to conduct proper measurements to determine the degree of corrosion. Any damage or deviation from normal measurements indicates a corrosion problem. Hence, a pit gauge is a very important tool in corrosion inspection.







Visual Inspections


Visual inspection is a common method of quality control, data acquisition, and data analysis. Visual Inspection, used in maintenance of facilities, mean inspection of equipment and structures using either or all of raw human senses such as vision, hearing, touch and smell and/or any non-specialized inspection equipment. Inspections requiring Ultrasonic, X-Ray equipment, Infra-red, etc. are not typically regarded as Visual Inspection as these Inspection methodologies require specialized equipment, training and certification.







Dye Penetrant


Dye penetrant inspection (DPI), also called liquid penetrant inspection (LPI) or penetrant testing (PT), is a widely applied and low-cost inspection method used to locate surface-breaking defects in all non-porous materials (metals, plastics, or ceramics). The penetrant may be applied to all non-ferrous materials and ferrous materials, although for ferrous components magnetic-particle inspection is often used instead for its subsurface detection capability. LPI is used to detect casting, forging and welding surface defects such as hairline cracks, surface porosity, leaks in new products, and fatigue cracks on in-service components.










Magnetic Particle


Magnetic particle Inspection (MPI) is a non-destructive testing (NDT) process for detecting surface and slightly subsurface discontinuities in ferromagnetic materials such as iron, nickel, cobalt, and some of their alloys. The process puts a magnetic field into the part. The piece can be magnetized by direct or indirect magnetization. Direct magnetization occurs when the electric current is passed through the test object and a magnetic field is formed in the material. Indirect magnetization occurs when no electric current is passed through the test object, but a magnetic field is applied from an outside source. The magnetic lines of force are perpendicular to the direction of the electric current, which may be either alternating current (AC) or some form of direct current (DC) (rectified AC).









Barcol Hardness


The Barcol hardness test characterizes the indentation hardness of materials through the depth of penetration of an indentor, loaded on a material sample and compared to the penetration in a reference material. The method is most often used for composite materials such as reinforced thermosetting resins or to determine how much a resin or plastic has cured. The test complements the measurement of glass transition temperature, as an indirect measure of the degree of cure of a composite. It is inexpensive and quick, and provides information on the cure throughout a part.








Remote Inspection Services


Remote Ultrasonic Inspection or Remote Digital Video Inspection, is a form of visual or other NDT inspection which uses specialized equipment including ultrasonic measurments and video technology to allow an inspector to look at objects and materials from a distance because the objects are inaccessible or are in dangerous environments. Remote inspection is a specialty branch of nondestructive testing (NDT).


Remote Inspection is commonly used as a predictive maintenance or regularly scheduled maintenance tool to assess the "health" and operability of fixed and portable assets. Remote Inspection enables greater inspection coverage, inspection repeatability and data comparison. The "remote" portion of this form of inspection refers to the characterization of the operator not entering the inspection area due to physical size constraints or potential safety issues related to the inspection environment.